2.5.1 Appointment of the Procurement Team

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The procurement process can often be complex with a number of different roles and responsibilities involved in the procurement chain. For every procurement exercise, a Procurement Team needs to be appointed, with an identified project owner, which is responsible for the implementation of the procurement exercise. The procurement team involves all the personnel engaged in the procurement process including the Evaluation Committees.

The co-ordinator of the Procurement Team - referred to as the Procurement Manager - carries the overall responsibility for the procurement process. This includes completing the procurement planning as well as the implementation of the procurement exercise in relation to:

Time;
Budget; and
Quality requirements. 

Contracting authorities should ensure that the procurement manager appointed to a project is able to undertake the following roles and responsibilities.

 

Table 2-5: Tasks of the Procurement Manager

 

Tasks of the Procurement Manager

 

General Responsibilities

-Overall responsibility and accountability to deliver a success procurement process
-Planning, organising, guiding, controlling and coordinating the team members
-Accountability for cost, schedule, quality and scope of the procurement
-Information flow and communication between procurement team and other stakeholders (e.g. beneficiaries)
-Compliance with all National Legislation and EU Procurement Directives, Guidances and best practices

 

Specific tasks:

-Composition, coordination and leadership of procurement team (job descriptions, supervision of results, quality control, etc.);
-Decision on any additional human resources needed, e.g. consultant contracts for feasibility studies, technical specifications, etc.;
-Responsible for checking resource allocation, and related risks with the relevant units of the contracting authority;
-Elaboration of a work plan and a time plan for the procurement implementation respecting the wider project cycle in general;
-Elaboration of a communication strategy (internal) and advertisement/ publication needs;
-Market research and commercial enquiries;
-Carrying overall responsibility for drafting of technical specifications and terms of references;
-Controlling change to the procurement scope, cost, or schedule;

 

Project Initiation/ The procurement manager should be assigned as early as possible in the life cycle of the project in order to establish management responsibility as well as to begin the development of the procurement requirements based on the stipulations in the project document

The Procurement Team is responsible for carrying out the different activities in the procurement process. Experts with different profiles may assist the Procurement Manager with planning and implementation the procurement exercise, and they may also assist with obtaining necessary commitments within the Contracting Authority. All stakeholders should interact with the Procurement Team to ensure that requirements are properly understood and implemented. The Procurement Team could consist of state employees, consultants and others contributing to the procurement exercise.

Public Procurement, as project implementation in general, is team work, with particular regard to cooperation and coordination. Thus, good experience has widely been made with the use of interdisciplinary teams that initiate, plan, execute, control, and close the various components of procurement. In general, there are organisational, financial, technical, legal issues, as well as communication/ public relation, and IT/ EDP matters, that are to be covered by the procurement team members. Usually, procurement experts do not work exclusively for one procurement exercise, but several different projects and procurement activities at the same time. In any case, the team members shall have clearly defined tasks and responsibilities, taking into account changing requirements when the project is progressing through its lifecycle.

The following definitions are used for the different procurement team members.

The Director of the Contracting Authority (or their nominated project owner) is also the Budget Holder and has responsibilities as defined by Legislation including  ensuring the existence of available money for the project and the procurement process
The Evaluation Committees evaluate the submitted tenders and have their roles and responsibilities defined by legislation. In cases where the evaluation committees are responsible for the awarding of the contract (depends on the value of the contract to be awarded) the consent of the Director is required.
The Tender Boards are permanent teams at a Ministerial Level, and are responsible for the awarding of the contract in cases where the value of the contract is above EU thresholds, and also where there is a dispute between the decision of the evaluation committee and the Director of the contracting authority in contracts below the EU threshold.
The team of procurement Officers within the contracting authority is responsible for the successful completion of the procurement process (i.e. preparation of tender documents, publication, communications, etc). Some of the team members are also likely to be responsible for the implementation of the contract.
The Project Board / Steering Committees are often formed in cases where the project is large or complex1 [ The Regulation 201/2007, which concerns the Contracting Authorities of the Central Government, foresees the appointment of a Management Committee by the Council of Ministers with specific authority and responsibilities, for large and complex projects. ].
Public Procurement Directorate personnel provide support and advice on the procurement process to the Contracting Authorities. In cases of EU funded projects, PPD being the Competent Authority in Public Procurement, has to approve the whole procedure and perform ex-ante controls. Generally PPD is responsible for the:
preparation of Legislation fully harmonized with the EU  Directives;
issuing Circulars regarding Public Procurement Matters;
providing training sessions to Contracting Authorities;
maintaining help desk facilities;
performing spot checks;
Monitoring overall performance and compliance of contracting authorities.

Contracting authorities are required to implement the procurement process involving each of the team members in the following roles and responsibilities.

 

Table 2-6: Roles and Responsibilities in the Procurement Process

Roles & Responsibilities

Head/Board of Directors

Evaluation Committees

Tender Boards

Procurement Manager

Procurement Officers

Project  Board / Steering Committee

PPD Officers

Business Case

P giving approval

 

 

 

P (project design team)

 

 

Budget Approval

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

Establishing Procurement Strategy/Arrangements

 

 

 

P

P

P

 

Providing Procurement Advice & Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

P

Giving Procurement Approval

P

 

 

 

 

P

 

Drafting Briefs/ Specification

P giving approval

 

 

P

P

P

 

Market Assessment

 

 

 

P

P

 

 

Managing Panels

 

 

 

P

 

P

 

Managing PPD input

 

 

 

P

 

 

 

Selecting Procurement Procedure

 

 

 

P

P

 

 

Approval of All Tender Documents

P

 

 

 

 

 

P in cases of EU funded projects (note 1)

Managing the tendering process

 

 

 

P

P

 

 

Evaluating Quotes & Tenders

P (giving consent)

P

 

 

 

 

 

Awarding of the contract

P

P

P

 

 

 

 

Approval of Award of Contract

 

 

 

 

 

 

P in cases of EU funded projects (note 1)

 

Note 1 : Issuance of Compliance Certificate

In general, there are organisational, financial, technical, legal issues, as well as communication/ public relation, and IT/ EDP matters, that are to be covered by the procurement officers. Usually, procurement officers do not work exclusively for one procurement exercise, but serve different projects and procurement activities at the same time. An example of the most relevant areas within the procurement process is to be found in the Responsibility Matrix below.

 

Table 2-7: Responsibility Matrix for Procurement Officers

Team Member

Field of Activity

Member 1

Member 2

Member 3

Member 4

Member 5

Organisation, logistics, documentation

e.g. Project Secretary

 

 

 

 

Technical drawings/ specifications

 

e.g. Technical Engineer

 

 

 

Financial issues, cost calculation, funding schemes

 

 

e.g. Budget and Finance Officer

 

 

Legal issues and contractual matters

 

 

 

e.g. Legal Officer/ Lawyer

 

IT and EDP issues

Project Secretary or add. Team Member

 

 

 

 

External communication, advertisements, publications

 

 

 

Legal Officer or Project Manager or add. Team M.

 

 

As can be seen by this table, any project has the potential for interdependencies and overlapping responsibilities. The procurement officers responsible for finance and funding, for example, will rely on the costs expected for elaborating technical specifications (Team Member 2) as well as for publications/ tender announcements (Team Member 4), and others. Teams may be formally or informally organised, and individual team members may be active or inactive. In some cases, procurement officers could also be appointed for several different tasks at one time, e.g. the Legal Officer, being responsible for the public relations as well as legal issues. This depends on the complexity and requirements of the project e. g. the scope of work and the level of expertise required. In any case, the procurement officers shall have clearly defined tasks and responsibilities, taking into account changing requirements when the project is progressing through its lifecycle.

 


© 2007 Republic of Cyprus, Treasury of the Republic, Public Procurement Directorate
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